Shanghai-Style Braised Pork Belly

Shanghai-Style Braised Pork Belly

Shanghai-Style Braised Pork Belly: As we creep towards middle age, Bill and I attempt to be fitter and prevent eating too much meat. We are no health nuts from any stretch of the imagination…we would eat anything and what if we did not need to be concerned about the danger of muffin tops. There is an infinite number of occasions when the two people walk into a gourmet or bakery store for the sole intention of simply moving into the look. So for the majority of our home-cooked meals nowadays, we try to stay fairly healthy–plenty of vegetables. But now, as a result of audiences like you, we are having pork for supper (along with a vegetable, of course). We are simply giving the starving public what they need, after all. Everybody understands it, and there are lots of variations and spins dependent on the original. Some of the well-known variants include the accession of squid (seems strange, but boy, can it be yummy ), hard-boiled eggs, and kale knots (one of Sarah’s favorites. See my mum’s recipe for Hongshao Rou with this variant ). Other pork stomach favorite recipes comprise Mei Cai Kou Rou, also a famous steamed pork stomach, Braised pork belly with arrowroot, a Cantonese New Year’s favor, And many others maybe not so similar but very great are Cantonese roast beef belly and cooked pork stomach.

The list continues, but because I am out of Shanghai, I love to cook them first, un-embellished Shanghai-style edition. This shanghai pork belly recipe is made for two to three individuals since I am cooking for just three here, but you can surely double or triple the recipe to get larger audiences. You might need to adjust the cooking time accordingly. The components are extremely easy: pork stomach, sugar, oil, wine, soy sauce, dark soy sauce. That is correct, only SIX components.

SHANGHAI BRAISED PORK BELLY: RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Begin by cutting out your pork to your Shanghai braised pork belly. Cut the pork belly to 3/4 inch thick pieces.
  2. Subsequently, bring a kettle of water to a boil. Blanch the pork for a few minutes. This eliminates impurities and begins the cooking procedure. Take the pork from the kettle and set aside.
  3. Over low heat, add sugar and oil into your wok. Melt the sugar slightly and then add the pork.
  4. It is extremely valuable to the color and taste of the dish you have both sorts of soy sauce! Just visit your regional Asian market, purchase a jar of each, and it’ll last you a year!
  5. Cover and simmer for approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour before the pork is fork-tender. Every 5-10 minutes, then stir to prevent burning and add more water if it becomes too dry. When the pork is fork-tender, even if there’s still a great deal of visible liquid, then find the wok, turn the heat, and stir continuously until the sauce has reduced into a shiny coating.
  6. And then, it is time to eat! Tell us in the comments if you are considering any other variants of the dish, and we’ll get right on it. (not that we are searching for another explanation to create it anything…)

Ingredients

  • 12 ounce lean, skin-on pork stomach (340g)
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 tbsp sugar (stone sugar is preferred if you’ve got it)
  • 3 tbsp Shaoxing wine
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 2 cups of water

Directions

  1. Start by cutting out your pork belly into 3/4-inch thick bits. Blanch the pork belly bits for a few of minutes. This eliminates impurities and begins the cooking procedure. Take the pork from this kettle, rinse, and place aside.
    Over low heat, add the sugar and oil into your wok. Melt the sugar slightly and then add the pork.
  2. Turn back the heat down to low and add Shaoxing cooking sweet, regular soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and water.
    NOTE: It is extremely valuable to the color and taste of the dish you have both sorts of soy sauce! Just visit your regional Asian market, purchase a jar of each, and it’ll last you a year!
  3. Cover and simmer for approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour before the pork is fork-tender. Every 5-10 minutes, then stir to prevent burning and add more water if it becomes too dry.
  4. When the pork is fork-tender, even if there’s still a great deal of visible liquid, then find the wok, turn up the heat, and stir continuously until the sauce has reduced into some glistening coating.

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